Pig Market Commentary

Each week the IFA compiles prices paid or quoted to its members nationwide. Take a look at the latest report below.

April 24, 2019

Pig prices continue to follow the upward European trend with all processors increasing their quotes for this week’s pigs. While most processors announced their increased quotes of 4c/kg last Friday, Rosderra, the country’s largest processor waited until after the long weekend and returned a 6c/kg increase to their suppliers. This leaves pig farmers receiving a price of €1.60-€1.62/kg. IFA Pigs Chairman said that there is extreme competition for pigs and prices will continue to rise over the coming weeks and months. He said that while most pig farmers were receiving the price quoted above, there were reports that some processors were attempting to buy pigs at lower than €1.60/kg and he said this has to stop. He called on all processors to continue to pass increased returns received from the improving market place on, to much needed pig price increases.

Ireland’s percentage of the EU price has improved and is currently 89% of the EU average price as reported to the EU Commission for the week commencing 8/4/2019.

Factory pig throughput in Republic of Ireland export plants for the week ending April 20th 2019 was 66,902 head which was 3,582 head less than the previous week and 876 less than in the corresponding week in 2018.

Export Plants: Top prices on a flat rate basis </= €1.62/kg in Staunton’s and Dawn Pork & Bacon, >/= €1.60/kg-€1.62/kg in Rosderra and Kepak.

Sows 0.85-0.92c/kg DW.

Weekly Slaughtering’s:  Week-ending 20/4//2019 Pigs: 65,021 Sows: 1,881

EU-27 PIGMEAT REFERENCE PRICE WK COMMENCING 8/4/19

Irish price                                            €1.48kg

EU–27 average price                         €1.66kg

(Grade E pigs – 55% to 60% lean meat excluding VAT but including transport and bonuses).

March 27, 2019

There was no change in pig price last week with all main processors holding quotes at €1.42 to €1.46/kg.  Despite the short working week with the bank holiday, all factories were very anxious for pigs and many processors have had to pay above quotes for this week’s pigs.  The market situation in Europe continues to improve driven mainly by demand from China.  The German pig price increased by 12c/kg over the past two weeks and now stands at €1.50/kg +.

Ireland’s percentage of the EU price has improved and is currently 101% of the EU average price as reported to the EU Commission for the week commencing 11/3/2019.

Factory pig throughput in Republic of Ireland export plants for the week ending March 23rd 2019 was 54,521 head which was 14,517 head less than the previous week and 6,910 less than in the corresponding week in 2018.

Export Plants: Top prices on a flat rate basis </= €1.46/kg in Staunton’s and Dawn Pork & Bacon, >/= €1.42/kg in Rosderra and Kepak.

Sows 50c/kg DW.

Weekly Slaughtering’s:  Week-ending 23/3/2019 Pigs: 52,857 Sows: 1,664

EU-27 PIGMEAT REFERENCE PRICE WK COMMENCING 11/3/19

Irish price                                            €1.41kg

EU–27 average price                         €1.39kg

(Grade E pigs – 55% to 60% lean meat excluding VAT but including transport and bonuses).

March 20, 2019

Following from a 4c/kg increase that factories passed onto pig farmers a week ago, they all held prices this week, but the negotiation power has definitely started to turn back towards sellers rather than buyers of pigs.

All procurement managers and agents are anxious to make sure they have enough pigs to meet demand, which is a very positive sign of the trade, especially in this, a bank holiday week. The main story driving the increased demand for pigmeat globally is African Swine Fever (ASF), a serious disease that effects swine but presents zero risk to humans. ASF has affected a large part of China, the world’s biggest producer, consumer and importer of pigmeat. Recent reports put the national Chinese pig herd at 16.6% lower year on year. While it is to the detriment of the pig industry in certain parts of China, it is the EU including Ireland, who are best placed to supply the increased demand to fill the growing void caused by ASF.

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